The FAMCare Blog

Homeless Students and Case Workers Face Mission Impossible

Posted by GVT Admin on Nov 2, 2018 10:41:04 AM

In recent years, homelessness in New York City has reached the highest levels since the Great Depression of the 1930s. In August 2018, there were 62,166 homeless people, including 15,189 homeless families with 22,511 homeless children, sleeping each night in the New York City municipal shelter system. The number of homeless New Yorkers sleeping each night in municipal shelters is now 79% higher than it was ten years ago, and families make up three-quarters of the homeless shelter population.

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Topics: social workers, social services, understanding clients, social services software, caseworkers, case worker stress relief, education, Homeless & Food Pantry, Global Vision Technologies, homeless students, New York City

Economic Imbalance: Social Worker's Salary vs. Burdensome Student Debt

Posted by GVT Admin on Sep 4, 2018 3:38:39 PM

In the past twenty years, student debt has become a major social and political issue in our country. As government guaranteed student loans became more widely available, colleges began to raise their tuition rates to keep pace with the expansion boom that ready government financing created. More students required more professors and facilities to accommodate their needs, and colleges needed more money to pay for the growth. The result, of course, is that students borrowed more and more money to pay inflated tuition and fees and subsequently became burdened with overwhelming debt.

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Topics: education, Nonprofit General, Child Welfare, Government, Social Services Industry News, student debt

Need Case Manager Stress Relief? Do These 4 Things Daily

Posted by GVT Admin on Aug 7, 2018 9:25:03 AM

 

Those who work in nonprofit or government agencies deal with high levels of stress daily. It can affect both your job and your home life. Unfortunately, case manager stress relief is something that is rarely put into practice.

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Topics: education, FAMCare Tips and Tools, case worker stress relief

Going Back to School Checklist

Posted by George Ritacco on Jul 10, 2018 8:41:00 AM

A friend of ours, Quinn Cooley has reached out with a great resource to share with our partners, clients and friends.  Quinn works with universities and programs to help share their content and he came across a great infographic from the team at Maryville University that we wanted to share.  We think this is a great educational resource for those who are ready to go back to school.

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Topics: Nonprofit General, education

Teachers on Strike

Posted by GVT Admin on Apr 18, 2018 9:00:00 AM
Teacher strikes are spreading across the country. In states where they are still woefully underpaid like Oklahoma and Arizona it is amazing that teachers can afford to go to work at all. But teachers in California and New York, on the other hand, are not striking strictly for pay increases. They are demanding more funding for education in general and are striking on behalf of their students who, they say, are being under-served in aging buildings without up-to-date technology, proper textbooks, or fundamental teaching aides. In other words, teachers are revolting against a perennial lack of proper funding for education across the country. How can the wealthiest country in the world fail to prioritize the education of its youth, when it is that very educational system that made it the wealthiest country in the world?

The Debate

Much of the national debate focuses on how best to make changes to our system of public education. How much should we rely on market forces and parental choice to drive improvement? Should we replace much of the traditional framework with privately run charter schools or by giving public funding directly to each parent in the form of vouchers? Unfortunately, little attention is being paid to how much we spend on education, and what it costs to provide the education we wish for our children.

The Actual Cost of Education

A Rutgers University study, The Real Shame of the Nation: The Causes and Consequences of Interstate Inequity in Public School Investments, reports the following:

  • It can cost anywhere between $5,000 and $30,000 a year per student in order to hit average test scores.
  • It costs more than three times the amount per pupil ($20k to $30k) to achieve national average outcome goals in very high poverty districts as it does in relatively low poverty districts ($5k to $10k).
  • High-poverty school districts in several states fall thousands to tens of thousands of dollars short, per pupil, of funding required to reach the relatively modest goal of current national average student performance outcomes on standardized assessments. In some states—notably Arizona, Mississippi, Alabama and California—the highest poverty school districts fall as much as $14,000 to $16,000 per pupil below necessary spending levels.

Intractable Problems

The Rutgers study revealed that two factors mainly determine where a district lies along the cost spectrum: location and mix of students. Some school districts bear higher costs because they’re located in expensive regions where salaries, including those of teachers, are high. Population density matters too. The cost of educating poor children escalates faster in urban areas.

The Rutgers Study Concludes

“Even with relatively high effort, some states simply lack the capacity to close the gaps we have identified. These interstate variations speak to the need for a new and enhanced federal role in improving interstate inequality in order to advance our national interest in improved education outcomes across states. Our empirical model shows that federal funding for schools has been insufficient for improving interstate inequality. Arguably, the interstate gaps we have presented strike at the core of our national interest and call for urgent federal action.”

Distribution of Available Assets

In other words, the educational funding system based on local taxes does not properly distribute funding to where it is needed across the national education landscape. What’s needed are revised formulas that risk asking some districts to take a smaller share of school funding so needier districts can be brought up to par. State policymakers are struggling with the politics of creating funding systems that target funds to districts with the greatest challenges. The bottom line, of course, is that while education is a vital tool, using education as a pathway out of poverty is a very expensive proposition that will require a coordinated federal approach.
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Topics: education, Social Services Industry News

Focus... LA Unified School District

Posted by GVT Admin on Mar 15, 2018 12:00:34 PM

Nonprofit's Role

There are 640,000 students currently registered in the Los Angeles Unified School District and 480,000 (75%) of them are Latinos. The LA. School Report reminds us that this past March 1st was the 50th anniversary of the big “blowout” when “thousands of young Latinos marched out of their East Los Angeles classrooms…for their right to be educated.”

Then

Writing for the LA. School Report, Esmeralda Romero notes, “Latino students in 1968 had no textbooks reflecting their history or their culture. They had to refrain from speaking Spanish at school. Teachers and school leaders didn’t look like them. Classrooms were overcrowded.”

Now

Fifty years later, thanks to the bravery of those students, things are better. Today in LA Unified, 37% of teachers are Latino, as well as 43% of school administrators and 38% of district officials. Now, 480,000 Latino students have access to all classes required for entrance into the state’s public universities. They study in bilingual programs and take ethnic studies courses. Many more are graduating and attending college.

More Progress Needed

But despite all these hard-won advances, Latino academic achievement and college graduation rates still lag far behind their peers. Only 24% rated “proficient” in math and 34% in English. Only 39% of the district’s Latino graduating high school seniors were deemed college or career ready. “We’re not there yet,” said Mónica García, President of LA Unified’s school board. “There are gaps in opportunity. There are gaps in achievement, in performance, and those gaps have roots in the institutional racism and classism that our young people fought against back then.”

The Community Steps Up

The limits imposed by systemic social attitudes and a ubiquitous shortfall in financial assets could only be addressed by the community at large. In the LA Unified School District, the community has responded.

Sunset Bronson Studios – This privately held company became among the first to partner with L.A. Unified by “adopting” Le Conte Middle School. It has donated and installed lighting and curtains for the school's theater and is planning a mentoring program to introduce students to its engineers and other employees who support the creative industry.

“I think it’s good for kids to learn that there are good, solid jobs in the creative side and the support side, which is really core to L.A.," Bill Humphrey, the General Manager of Sunset, said. "And if we can get that across to kids and get them the exposure to say, 'Hey, wow that's in our community, I think I should learn that trade,' that in itself will be a great accomplishment."

The Nonprofit Community

Sunset Bronson Studios may be among the first in the community to offer creative support to Latino students struggling to enter the main stream of American life, but Sunset Bronson is not alone. The following list of nonprofits, large and small, who are taking an active part in supporting the education of LA Unified’s 640,000 students heartens and inspires anyone who takes the time to take a look.

  • 826LA - dedicated to supporting student writing.
  • DIYgirls - Encourages young women to explore technology and engineering through innovative educational experiences.
  • GameDes - Promotes learning through computer games.
  • GLADEO - helps young people find and pursue their dream careers.
  • HOLA - Heart of Los Angeles gives some of the city’s most vulnerable youth a chance to succeed in life.
  • Gumball Foundation - is creating the next generation of inner-city social entrepreneurs by providing access to higher education.
  • I.am.angel foundation seeks to TRANS4M lives through education, inspiration & opportunity.
  • Imagination Foundation - finds, fosters and funds creativity and entrepreneurship in kids across LA and around the world.
  • IOW (INSIDE OUT WRITERS) reduces juvenile recidivism through writing. Paper. Pen. Persistence.
  • INNER-CITY ARTS - provides arts education to those children most in need.
  • LIBROS SCHMIBROS - champions the pleasures of literature and its power to change lives.
  • SCHOOL ON WHEELS - Provides tutoring to homeless children in LA
  • TWENTY MILLION MINDS - reduces college costs by democratizing educational content.
  • WRITE GIRL - Within a community of women writers, Write Girl promotes creativity and self-expression to empower girls.

Admiration - Congratulations - Thanks

The more we at Global Vision Technologies learn about our nationwide nonprofit community the more admiration and gratitude we feel.
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Topics: Nonprofit General, Social Services Industry News, education

Try as We Might - The National Effort to Improve Public Education

Posted by George Ritacco on Oct 18, 2017 8:00:00 AM

The debate over what to do about the declining quality of public education continues unabated. The unyielding stance taken by the teacher’s union, the economic decline of rust-belt, inner-city neighborhoods, the erosion of the two-parent home, and the unmanaged growth of immigration are all blamed for the decline. There doesn’t seem to be an answer that everyone can agree on.

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Topics: Social Services Industry News, education

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