The FAMCare Blog

Fostering discussions on industry news, effective data management, improved workflow, morale and funding.

Self-Care for New Caregivers

When we’re very busy taking care of other people, it’s easy to overlook the need to take care of ourselves. But self-care is vitally important for making sure you’re up to the challenges of being a caregiver. In order to be there for your loved ones and handle all your responsibilities, you need to keep up your health and energy levels. Here are some tips for making time for yourself in your everyday life.

Read More
June 04 ,2018

Civil Discourse

 

Guns in the United States

  • In 2016, firearms were responsible for more than 38,000 deaths and over 116,000 nonfatal gunshot wounds in the United States.
  • The United States owns approximately 250 million gunsnearly one for each citizen, and grows about 7 million each year.
  • Each year, the United States has a bit over 8,000 murders with firearms.
  • According to data from the Gun Violence Archive, a total of 346 mass shootings (5 or more victims) occurred in the U.S. in 2017.
  • As of May 17th 2018, 101 mass shootings have already occurred this year.  
Read More
June 01 ,2018

In Their Own Words

Social Work Today magazine has just published the top ten list of social workers who were nominated by their peers for outstanding performance in the past year. We are proud to reprint these inspirational comments from the finalists in their own words.

Read More
May 22 ,2018

Raise more money with a special event program

Read More
May 16 ,2018

5 Difficulties Today's Nonprofit CEOs Face That Were Unheard of 10 Years Ago

The CEOs of nonprofit agencies have always faced challenges that are uniquely theirs. These difficulties continue to change and evolve as both the industry and those who nonprofits aim to help do so as well. Even within the past five or 10 years, these challenges have proven to be unlike any others faced in years past.

Read More
May 15 ,2018

Homelessness - An Innovative Solution

 

A Former Disney Employee Tells This Story

Yeweinisht Mesfin went missing in November 2016. Her fellow Disneyland employees found her in her car in a gym parking lot. She lived in her car and that gym parking lot was her home. She would use the gym to shower and use the restroom. After suffering a heart attack, she died in her car waiting for someone to find her.

Read More
May 09 ,2018

Anorexia Nervosa

Read More
May 02 ,2018

Neglecting Native Americans

A colleague recently wrote us and noted that we rarely cover the American Indian community in this blog. She was correct. We confess that our oversight is probably a reflection of a broader cultural blindness to Native American social issues in general. Perhaps this numbed sensitivity comes from the fact that Native Americans do not make as much noise as other underprivileged minorities. It seems to be part of their native dignity to suffer in silence without complaint and, unfortunately, in American social justice “the squeaky wheel gets the oil”.

Read More
May 01 ,2018

Predictive Risk Modeling

In a recent issue of Social Work Today, Kate Jackson reported this troubling statistic:

Read More
April 19 ,2018

Teachers on Strike

Teacher strikes are spreading across the country. In states where they are still woefully underpaid like Oklahoma and Arizona it is amazing that teachers can afford to go to work at all. But teachers in California and New York, on the other hand, are not striking strictly for pay increases. They are demanding more funding for education in general and are striking on behalf of their students who, they say, are being under-served in aging buildings without up-to-date technology, proper textbooks, or fundamental teaching aides. In other words, teachers are revolting against a perennial lack of proper funding for education across the country. How can the wealthiest country in the world fail to prioritize the education of its youth, when it is that very educational system that made it the wealthiest country in the world?

The Debate

Much of the national debate focuses on how best to make changes to our system of public education. How much should we rely on market forces and parental choice to drive improvement? Should we replace much of the traditional framework with privately run charter schools or by giving public funding directly to each parent in the form of vouchers? Unfortunately, little attention is being paid to how much we spend on education, and what it costs to provide the education we wish for our children.

The Actual Cost of Education

A Rutgers University study, The Real Shame of the Nation: The Causes and Consequences of Interstate Inequity in Public School Investments, reports the following:

  • It can cost anywhere between $5,000 and $30,000 a year per student in order to hit average test scores.
  • It costs more than three times the amount per pupil ($20k to $30k) to achieve national average outcome goals in very high poverty districts as it does in relatively low poverty districts ($5k to $10k).
  • High-poverty school districts in several states fall thousands to tens of thousands of dollars short, per pupil, of funding required to reach the relatively modest goal of current national average student performance outcomes on standardized assessments. In some states—notably Arizona, Mississippi, Alabama and California—the highest poverty school districts fall as much as $14,000 to $16,000 per pupil below necessary spending levels.

Intractable Problems

The Rutgers study revealed that two factors mainly determine where a district lies along the cost spectrum: location and mix of students. Some school districts bear higher costs because they’re located in expensive regions where salaries, including those of teachers, are high. Population density matters too. The cost of educating poor children escalates faster in urban areas.

The Rutgers Study Concludes

“Even with relatively high effort, some states simply lack the capacity to close the gaps we have identified. These interstate variations speak to the need for a new and enhanced federal role in improving interstate inequality in order to advance our national interest in improved education outcomes across states. Our empirical model shows that federal funding for schools has been insufficient for improving interstate inequality. Arguably, the interstate gaps we have presented strike at the core of our national interest and call for urgent federal action.”

Distribution of Available Assets

In other words, the educational funding system based on local taxes does not properly distribute funding to where it is needed across the national education landscape. What’s needed are revised formulas that risk asking some districts to take a smaller share of school funding so needier districts can be brought up to par. State policymakers are struggling with the politics of creating funding systems that target funds to districts with the greatest challenges. The bottom line, of course, is that while education is a vital tool, using education as a pathway out of poverty is a very expensive proposition that will require a coordinated federal approach.
Read More
April 18 ,2018

Subscribe to Email Updates

 
CrowdReviews.com Logo
The crowd rates us 4.5 out of 5.0

Read all 8 Reviews / Write A Review

 

The Top 10 FAMCare FAQ Video Series

The Top 10 FAMCare FAQ Video SeriesHow does it work?  How will it save me time? 

 

How can I change it and make it my own? Is it HIPAA compliant? 

How will it help me attract more funding?  How will it keep my caseworkers focused?

    

QUESTIONS everyone wants to know.  We've developed a video series that reveals in 3-5 minute "VIDBITS"... live-action and video simulation answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about FAMCare CONNECT.
    

Access

 

 

Latest Articles